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Glossary of Ikebana Terminology

Chabana
an ikebana arrangement designed to be displayed in a tea ceremony room, or in connection with a tea ceremony. Like the tea ceremony itself, chabana arrangements should be simple, understated, and restrained.

Hana
flower(s)

Hanaire or Suiban
flower container, vase, bowl for flower arrangement

Hasami
clippers or scissors used for cutting floral and plant materials for ikebana. unlike garden shears or cutters, these scissors do not have a spring in the grip.

Heika
ikebana arrangement in a tall, cylindrical vase with a narrow opening

Iemoto
the headmaster of an ikebana school

Ikebana school
a school of ikebana is a method or style of arranging flowers and other materials. it may or may not have a physical "school building"

Kenzan
a holder into which flowers are insertedso that they are fixed firmly for an ikebana arrangement. in general, kenzan have many sharp points,and are called a "pin holder" or "needlepoint holder" in english. also known as a "frog".

Komi
a v-shaped flower holder cut from a thick branch

Komiwara
a flower holder made of straw sheaves,into which the branches used in the arrangementare inserted.

Mizugiwa
the base of the arrangement; the root or origin of the flower arrangement.

Moribana
ikebana arrangement in a low, shallow container with a wide opening

Nageire style
an ikebana arrangement in a tall vase."nageire" means "thrown-in" in the original meaning of this term,one sticks the flowers in by simply throwing them in the vase.however, the style has become formalized.

Rikka style
the first formal style of flower arrangement,developed in the early part of the fifteenth century. how the flowers are to be arranged is determined by strict formal rules.

Seika or shoka style
a type of traditional ikebana arrangement characterized by a tight bundle of stemswhich form a triangular three-branched asymmetrical structure. this style is similar to the rikka style, but has fewer, less strict rules. it originated in the mid-18th century.

Tokonoma
an alcove in a traditional japanese-style room. the alcove is set aside for the display of beautiful objects, including ikebana arrangements.


Ikebana Schools
Chiko
Chiko
Ichiyo
Ichiyo
Ikenobo
Ikenobo
Misho
Misho
Ohara
Ohara
Ryusei-Ha
Ryuseiha
Saga Goryu
Saga Goryu
Shinpa Seizan
Shinpa Seizan
Sogetsu
Sogetsu
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